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Katedra politologie Fakulty sociálních studií

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies is open to students holding a Bachelor’s or equivalent degree in the social sciences (political science, international relations, European studies, and related disciplines, including history, law, economics, etc.), or in the humanities, from a recognized institution of higher education. For admission to the programme, candidates must have a minimum B2 English language level under the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) at the time of enrolment.

Most courses are taught by members of the Department of Political Science of the Faculty of Social Studies, although many (one-time) workshops and simulations are led by domestic and foreign experts in particular fields.

Students will be awarded a Master‘s Degree in Conflict and Democracy Studies from Masaryk University.

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies aims to:

  1. Provide a program that will fulfil the needs of students preparing for careers in fields concerned with (the quality of) democracy and conflict (or those with a general interest in democracy, democratization, and conflict). Students will therefore be exposed to all the relevant concepts and theories that describe and explain the dynamics of different kinds of conflict.
  2. Explore how various actors (government, non-state, supra-state, sub-state and private organizations) interact, and how they influence both the course of conflict and the quality of democracy, as well as how the quality of democracy influences the approach to homeland and international security (and by contrast how security influences the quality of democracy)?
  3. Expand students’ ability to think independently and critically, to expand their capacity for understanding the concepts and events discussed from various perspectives (e.g. institutional, social, psychological, historical, cultural), and to encourage them to develop their soft and other personal skills.

Autumn / Spring

September / February

Two years (four semesters)

The obligatory courses cover the most relevant theoretical concepts of democracy, democratization, and conflict studies. At the same time, students are guided to the best methodology for carrying out their own research. As part of the curriculum, students are also required to participate in an internship at an institution of their choice (a list of available internships is regularly updated).

Elective courses offer students the opportunity to specialize in their field of interest. They cover topics like information war and propaganda, terrorism, populism, Eurasian security, militant democracies, conflict management, etc. (see below for further details).

Yes. At least 4 weeks in.

Position papers, essays, individual/group in-class presentations, coursework, written or oral exams, Master’s dissertation

€3000 per year

Tuition fees are payable at the beginning of each semester via the IS in euros (invoice generated automatically), or on the basis of an invoice issued by the Faculty’s finance office with the sum in euros and CZK, as well; on request, tuition may be paid in two instalments. Read the file linked below for current semester info.

Tuition fees must be covered by the time the course enrolment period closes at the end of the second week of teaching—for Autumn 2016, this means between 5 September and 3 October.  For full payment instructions and options, please read carefully tuition fee payment Autumn 2016.

Living costs depend upon individual lifestyles and regional prices.
The average cost of living in Brno is estimated at about €500 per month.
(accommodation (https://www.skm.muni.cz/kolej?en): approx. €150 per month; meals €150-€200 per month, public transport €100 per year)

Admitted students are encouraged to apply for scholarships offered through government agencies, private foundations, and other sources, e.g. the Visegrad Fund (conditions).


Course Offerings


Conflict Analysis

Lecturer:

  • Tomáš Šmíd

Annotation

This course is an overview of the field of conflict analysis in terms of theory and practice. In it, the students will explore the central concepts, definitions, perspectives and theories of causes of conflicts, and approaches to conflict intervention. Students also get to know concepts and practical examples of conflict resolution and peace processes. Next dimension of conflict analysis comprises complex phenomenon of conflict actors, whether state and regular or non-state and irregular. In the course will be discussed the development of thinking about the war over years, especially „school of new wars“ versus „defenders of Clausewitz´s principles“. At the end of the course, students should be able to professionally and comprehensibly describe and analyze any armed/violent conflict.

Course structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Definition of Conflict, Incompatibility
  3. Classification and Typologies of Conflict
  4. Causes of Conflict
  5. Triggers of Conflict
  6. Process and Dynamics of Conflict
  7. Conflict Resolution
  8. Conflict Actors
  9. Intensity and Asymmetry of Conflict
  10. Old Wars and New Wars I. – Classic War and Symmetric Conflicts
  11. Old Wars and New Wars II. – Rebellion, Insurgency, Hybrid War, Criminalisation of Conflict
  12. Non-Armed Conflict – Sanctions, Embargos
  13. Final Exam

Methodology of Conflict and Democracy Studies

Lecturers:

  • Peter Spáč
  • Marek Rybář

Annotation

In this course, we will explore the logic and methods of political research on political conflict and democracy.  The aim is to prepare graduate students to understand the key principles of research design and methods in political analysis and to help them prepare their own research projects. Upon its completion, students will learn how to assess the strengths and weaknesses of select methods and techniques used in the analysis of democracy and political conflicts. Among other topics, we shall discuss the goals of empirical political research, how to formulate good research questions and hypotheses, and what it takes to assess the evidence gathered to test them.

Course structure

  1. Introductory and Organizational Matters
  2. Research Design 1 – Role of the Research, Aims, Concepts, Questions
  3. Research Design 2 – Theory, Hypotheses, Variables, Causality
  4. Research Design 3 – Writing a Research Design, Research Ethics
  5. Questionnaire Design
  6. Semi-structured Interviews
  7. Process-Tracing Methodology
  8. Content and Discourse Analysis
  9. Seminar 1
  10. Seminar 2
  11. Seminar 3

Pluralism and Disagreement: Issues in Political Theory

Lecturers

  • Jiří Baroš
  • Pavel Dufek

Annotation

The goal of the course is to introduce students to the study of contemporary issues in political theory. It tries to do so by discussing hotly debated and widely contested issues such as nationalism, multiculturalism, secularism, political Islam, constitutionalism, democracy, constitutional patriotism, and migration. Therefore, the moral and political issues that play a major role in contemporary public discourse will be addressed. Fundamental issues in contemporary politics will be investigated through reflection on current discussions in political theory. The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the current state of the theoretical literature on several crucial issues in contemporary political theory as well as to enable them to engage in their own critical thinking about competing visions and different understanding of them. After introducing these pressing questions of political morality, the course will elaborate theoretical approaches to those questions. The course aims to encourage students to consider these issues in a reflective, systematic manner, and to equip students with skills that will enable them to do so. The focus will be on contemporary approaches to these problems rather than on classical works of political thought.

Course structure

  1. Introductory Session
  2. Political Concepts and Theories
  3. Moral Pluralism and Deep Disagreement in Constitutional Democracy
  4. Realism and Idealism in Political Theory
  5. Constitutionalism and Democracy: Current Developments
  6. Constitutionalism and Constitutional Patriotism
  7. Nationalism and Multiculturalism
  8. Secularism, Religion and Political Islam
  9. Migration and Political Theory
  10. The Majority Principle in Democracy: Essential or Oppressive?
  11. Representation and the Quest for Democratic Innovations
  12. Globalisation and International Political Theory: Poverty and the Human Right to Health
  13. Discussion/First exam slot

Policy Analysis

Lecturer

  • Stanislav Balík

Annotation

The course aims to provide students with practice-oriented competencies in policy analysis. Students will be able to apply the tools of “policy analysis” – to identify, analyze and deal with relevant issues of democracy and conflicts, within multilevel European and Western political systems. Groups of two or three students will choose a specific (real) problem in the field of conflict and democracy and identify how this problem is reflected in the policies of concrete political systems (including controversial issues and positions of stakeholders). Following this analysis, students will formulate a policy paper (from a position of an interested actor) which will include specifying short- and medium-term strategies aimed at achieving the objectives of the actors. Students will also be able to evaluate, criticize or compare policies designed to manage conflicts in a democracy.

Course structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Policy analysis – basic concepts
  3. Policy analysis – theoretical approaches I.
  4. Policy analysis – theoretical approaches II.
  5. Alternative political analysis models
  6. Group work – preparing policy paper I.
  7. Group work – preparing policy paper II.
  8. Group work – preparing policy paper III.
  9. Reading week
  10. Presentations and discussion about projects I.
  11. Presentations and discussion about projects II.
  12. Presentations and discussion about projects III.
  13. Evaluation

Security Systems and Actors

Lecturers

  • Miroslav Mareš
  • Petra Vejvodová

Annotation

This course focuses on analysis and understanding of functions of the security system and the role of specific security actors. Methods and approaches towards security analysis are explained. Use of security databases is included as one of the skills taught in this course. Students will write case studies of selected systems or actors. At the end of the course, the students should be capable of finding important data related to security policy, to analyze political systems and to evaluate the importance of security actors within the political process.

Course structure

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Conceptualization of security systems and security actors
  3. General security systems and security actors
  4. Security systems and actors within foreign and military policy
  5. Security systems and actors within homeland security policy
  6. Security systems and actors within energy security policy and other fields of security policy
  7. System thinking and analysis
  8. Modeling of security systems
  9. Use of selected databases with security relevance (SIPRI, Eurostat, etc.)
  10. Cases studies of security systems and actors (I)
  11. Cases studies of security systems and actors (II)
  12. Case studies of security systems and actors (III)
  13. Final exam

Theory of Democratization

Lecturer

  • Jan Holzer

Annotation

The goal of this course is to provide basic information about theories of democratization. The course focuses on the classical theory of revolution, as well as the debate on assumptions/reasons for the breakdowns of non-democracies, transitions to democracy and finally varieties of models outputs from these processes, ranging from the consolidation of democracy through semi-democratization or hybridization to the reconsolidation of non-democracies. At the end of the course, the students are familiar with current trends in the concept of democratization (colored revolutions, so-called modern authoritarianisms etc.).
The data part of the course is designed to understand the era of so-called third wave of democratization.
The course is based, among others, on the works of D. Berg-Schlosser, V. Bunce, L. Diamond, J. Grugel, Ch. Haerpfer, S. P. Huntington, J. J. Linz, A. Schedler, J. Teorell, Ch. Welzel and many others.

At the end of the course students should be able to: understand and explain the issues (paradigms, concepts) connected to the phenomenon of democratization; distinguish among outputs from separate types of non-democracies (consolidated democracy, semi-democratic/hybrid regimes, non-democracies); apply the theory of democratization to the concrete examples of political regimes; and consider the situation of concrete political regime in the relationship to its phase of democratization.

Course structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Historical sociology, classical concepts of revolution, and class theory
  3. Modernization as a Paradigm of Democratization
  4. Theory of transition
  5. Democracy promotion as a Paradigm of Democratization
  6. Theory of semi-democratic and hybrid regimes
  7. Reading week
  8. Theory of democratic consolidation
  9. Theory of democratization and human rights studies
  10. Theory of democratization and electoral studies
  11. Current lectures on democratization
  12. Contemporary trends in the theory of transition and democratization and methodology of their research
  13. Test

Quality of Democracy in Europe

Lecturer

  • Petra Svačinová

Annotation

This course will focus on some important concepts in the theory of the quality of democracy and approaches to study the quality of democracy empirically. The topics to be discussed contain the main concepts (policy responsiveness, accountability, mandate responsiveness), and additional topics, which are often connected to the quality of democracy. Students will prepare essays including their own empirical research focusing measuring quality of democracy in a chosen European democracy.

Course structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Theories of democracy and quality of democracy
  3. Types of democracy
  4. Policy responsiveness
  5. Mandate responsiveness
  6. Accountability
  7. Political representation
  8. Political participation
  9. Political competition
  10. Political equality
  11. Quality of democracy at lower levels of governance
  12. Students presentations
  13. Students presentations

Diploma Thesis

Students consult their diploma thesis on a regular basis with the supervisor.

Interneship

An internship is grounded in work at a selected organisation (e.g. WHO, People in Need, UN etc.) by a student. An internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career opportunities while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in the field. The experience also helps students get a clearer sense of what they still need to learn. Internships should be at least four weeks in length. The internship may occur during the academic year or the summer.

The internship will provide students with the opportunity to:

  1. acquire first-hand knowledge about the field of work,
  2. explore new professional activities and relationships,
  3. apply classroom knowledge and skills to the work environment,
  4. experience problems and contributing to solutions in the field,
  5. develop and refine oral and written communication skills, and
  6. learning by doing.

Branding of extremist and terrorist organizations

Lecturers

  • Otto Eibl
  • Miroslav Mareš

Annotation

Like every other organization on the planet, extremest and terrorist organizations are perceived differently by various audiences. Extremist and terrorist organizations use branding and other marketing tools to promote and spread their ideas and to distinguish themselves from other organizations. Carefully crafted branding activities incorporate a complex system of meaning and emotion to facilitate the delivery of their core messages.
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the study of branding of extremist and terrorist organizations. The lectures focus on different aspects of branding (brand equity, study of symbols, meaning management, etc.), the seminars focus on selected (historical and contemporary) case studies (NSDAP, ISIS, etc.). At the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and understand brands and branding activities of extremist and terrorist organizations. During the course, the students will be encouraged to use critical thinking and discuss and share their ideas on the topic with others.

Course structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Theory of branding
  3. Use of branding by extremist and terrorist scene
  4. Seminar I (case studies of historical and contemporary extremist and terrorist branding)
  5. Seminar II (“field research” – extremist branding on the streets of the modern metropolis)
  6. Seminar III (Students’ presentations)
  7. Final exam

Conflict management

Lecturer

  • Věra Stojarová

Annotation

The students will be confronted with the series of case studies. Negotiating is a comprehensive training tool for executives, officials and others engaged in cross-cultural negotiation. The students will learn through selected case studies the difficulties of negotiating any given issue across cultures. The negotiation will also provide an opportunity to understand more deeply selected cross-cultural conflicts. Coexistence draws from numerous cases to illustrate what countries can do after violent ethnic conflict subsides to rebuild society.

Course Structure

  1. Bloc A: Rwanda Genocide
  2. Bloc B: Panda Acquisition
  3. Bloc C: Kaotian crisis
  4. Bloc D: Israel/Palestine

Democracy and Politics in Central Europe

Lecturers

  • Vratislav Havlík
  • Lubomír Kopeček
  • Marek Rybář

Annotation

The goal of the course is to introduce students to the study of political processes and democratic institutions (political parties, election systems, presidents, cabinets etc.) in Central Europe after 1989. Background of the course is to show political development from the Annus Mirabilis to the contemporary political situation in the countries of the Visegrad Group – Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and Hungary.

Course Structure

  1. Transitions to democracy in Central Europe: theory, concepts and cases
  2. The dissolution of Czechoslovakia
  3. Czech democracy and politics since 1989
  4. Czech political institutions
  5. Slovak democracy and politics since 1989
  6. Slovak political institutions
  7. Polish democracy and politics since 1989
  8. Polish political institutions
  9. Hungarian democracy and politics since 1989
  10. Hungarian political institutions

Dilemmas of Counter-Terrorism in Europe

Lecturers

  • Miroslav Mareš
  • Petra Vejvodová

Annotation

The goal of the course is to introduce basic issues related to strategies for countering radicalization that leads to violent extremism and terrorism. Students will get a deeper insight into the issues associated with using preventive and repressive measures to counter radicalization. The course will examine different approaches to deal with radicalization and terrorism in the European context (depending on actors relevant for the issue).  The course will also discuss ethical aspects of counter-terrorism measures.     

Course Structure

  1. Introduction to course
  2. Definition of counter-terrorism and basic issues
  3. Use of force against terrorism
  4. Targeted killing as an instrument of counter-terrorism
  5. Draconic laws, torture etc. as instruments of counter-terrorism
  6. Counter-radicalization
  7. Exit programs
  8. Counter-narratives against terrorist propaganda
  9. Case study I
  10. Case study II
  11. Case study III
  12. Case study IV
  13. Summary of the course

Electoral Violence: Theory and Practice

Lecturer

  • Michal Mochťak

Annotation

Electoral disputes accompanied by violent outbreaks have become an emerging problem in societies under transformation, in authoritarian regimes, as well as in young democracies. The truth is that many politicians elected to office, their supporters, and political activists have altered their perceptions of electoral competition in the form of zero-sum logic with direct consequences for their opponents. The course aims at introducing the phenomenon of electoral violence as an extreme form of electoral competition. Building on debates about violence and conflict, the overall goal is to approach electoral violence as an alternative tool of electoral campaigning, which is applied in order to achieve political ends. Electoral violence is in this context discussed in two stages – as a strategic supplement and as a strategic substitute. At the end of the course, the students will be able to identify and understand the general patterns of electoral violence, its dynamics, roots and effects. Moreover, the course will discuss different contexts of electoral violence, which will be further analysed in order to identify potential theoretical as well as empirical implications for the study of the phenomenon.

Course Structure

  1. Introductory lecture: scope of the course, organization of the course, requirements
  2. Electoral violence as a subject of study
  3. What is “violence”: theoretical and empirical implications for the study of electoral violence
  4. Election and conflict: story about losers and winners
  5. Drivers of electoral violence: from personal motivations to organized actions
  6. Different contexts of electoral violence: from democracy to autocracy
  7. Reading Week
  8. Electoral integrity and electoral violence
  9. TBA
  10. Electoral frauds and electoral violence
  11. Presentation of projects 1 (seminar)
  12. Presentation of projects 2 (seminar)
  13. Final examination (1st term)

Eurasian Security

Lecturers

  • Josef Kraus
  • Tomáš Šmíd

Annotation

The goal of the course is to introduce students to key problems of security in Eurasia. At the end of the course, the students should be capable of evaluating most important issues of Eurasian Security from the standpoint of their geopolitical situation, major armed conflict, energy and resource politics, religious radicalism and extremism, international organized crime networks and trans-nationalized non-state armed actors.

Course Structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Specification and Demarcation of Eurasia – basic geographical a historical facts
  3. Global geopolitics of Eurasia
  4. Resource and Energy Games in Eurasia I. – Persian Gulf and Caspian Basin
  5. Resource and Energy Games in Eurasia II. – South China Sea
  6. Reconnection of Eurasia – New Silk Road, TRACECA, Sea transport (String of Pearls. Piracy)
  7. Eastern Europa as Conflict Zone (Russia versus Ukraine etc.)
  8. Organized Crime in Eurasia – Russian mafia, Chinese triads, Yakuza
  9. Warlordism and Militias in Eurasia – Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Caucasus
  10. Proliferation of WMD – Iran case, Pakistani – Indian conflict, Syria
  11. Middle East as Zone of Religious Violence
  12. Terrorist Networks across Eurasia
  13. Migration and Eurasia – Main Routes

Far Right and Left Parties in Europe

Lecturer

  • Věra Stojarová

Annotation

The course focuses on the European far right and left parties. The module offers an understanding of far right and left party families in Europe, including their definition, identification, explanatory models, and a coherent conceptual and empirical framework to study party families.

Course Structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Conceptualisation of far right and far left
  3. Far Right: Case study France FN
  4. Far Right in Austria (FPÖ, BZÖ)
  5. Scandinavian: Swedish democrats SD
  6. Case study Central Europe: Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic
  7. Far Right: Balkans
  8. Mid-term test
  9. Overview of European far left
  10. The German Far Left: a success story
  11. Far Left: French and Italian radical left: failure?
  12. Far Left in Eastern Europe
  13. Pre-term test

How to Survive an Emergency Situation

Lecturers

  • Josef Kraus
  • Tomáš Šmíd

Annotation

The goal of the course is the students to be familiar with basic variants of emergency and crisis situations and how one should react to them. Those situations concerning urban and rural environments will be described and analyzed, and students will be prepared to respond to them with minimal risks to personal safety.
Survival skills are techniques a person may use in a dangerous situation to save themselves or others. Distinguished lectures and seminars are led by external professional experts in first aid, wilderness survival, negotiation etc. The course includes a hostage survival simulation to practice skills and knowledge obtained in the course.

Course Structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Emergency and Crisis Situations – Terminology, Classification
  3. Safe Travelling to Crisis Regions
  4. Urban Survival
  5. Wilderness Survival I.
  6. Wilderness Survival II.
  7. First Aid I. (Theory and Practice)
  8. First Aid II. (Theory and Practice)
  9. Imprisonment Survival and Interrogation
  10. Negotiation, Escape and Evasion
  11. Hostage Survival – Theory and Simulation
  12. Evaluation of the Course and Survival Skills of Students

Hybrid Warfare

Lecturers

  • Jakub Drmola
  • Miloš Gregor
  • Petra Vejvodová

Annotation

The course aims to explore the emergence of the concept of hybrid warfare, its evolution through a historical perspective, and its characteristic features. In the first part of the course, students will learn about current strategies, diffusion of the battlespace and its expansion into cyberspace, which plays an increasingly important part in conflicts today. This includes threats of cyber-espionage, sabotage and hacktivism, their associated actors and common attack vectors. In the second part of the course, students will focus on information warfare and specifically on propaganda.

Course Structure

  1. Introduction
  2. Historical perspective of hybrid warfare
  3. Conceptualization of cyber warfare
  4. Non-state ideological actors of cyber warfare
  5. State actors of cyberwarfare
  6. Conceptualization of information warfare
  7. Propaganda
  8. Manipulative techniques of propaganda
  9. Case studies of propaganda
  10. Seminar session I
  11. Seminar session II
  12. Seminar session III
  13. Final written test

Modern Authoritarianism: undemocratic rule in the 21st century

Lecturer

  • Michal Mochťak

Annotation

The course aims at introducing the phenomenon of so-called modern authoritarianism, a modern form of authoritarian rule that has evolved in the past 15 years as a reaction to political pressure, international democracy support and continuing process of hybridization. Starting with a discussion about the hybrid regimes and classic examples of the nondemocratic rule, the course presents the current trend of advancing authoritarianism, their domestic and international dynamics, advantages and shortcomings.
At the end of the course, the students will be able to identify and understand general patterns of modern authoritarianism, its strategies, motivations and interests. Moreover, the potential threat to liberal democracy as an alternative political system will be discussed. Empirical examples from Central and Eastern Europe, MENA region and Central Asia will demonstrate the everyday practices of these regimes.

Course Structure

  1. Introductory lecture: scope of the course, organization of the course, requirements
  2. Historical experience with non-democracy. Theoretical and empirical background
  3. Hybrid regimes. What went wrong with the transformation?
  4. Modern authoritarianism as an advancing form of authoritative rule: an introduction
  5. Modern authoritarianism in Central and Eastern Europe: Rise of Russian Influence
  6. Modern authoritarianism in democratic world: Authoritarian personality and its forms
  7. Reading Week
  8. Modern authoritarianism and economic order: Business is business no matter what
  9. Modern authoritarianism and media: the power of propaganda and intentional spread of disinformation
  10. Modern authoritarianism as a security threat
  11. Presentation of projects 1 (seminar)
  12. Presentation of projects 2 (seminar)
  13. Final examination (1st term)

Political History of Central Europe in the 20th Century

Lecturers

  • Vratislav Havlík
  • Lubomír Kopeček

Annotation

The course is focused on description and analysis of late modern and contemporary history of Central European countries. The course takes a historical and political science oriented perspective to survey basic societal, economic, and (mainly) political processes and developments in countries of the Visegrad group – Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Hungary. The course includes historical background from the first period of democratization (1890s till 1920s/1930s) and discusses the shape of communist regimes after World War II including implications for the contemporary situation. Cases are selected with regard to different historical arrangements, traditions and developments. The main aim of the course is to present a rich and comprehensive survey of difficulties that had to be faced by Central European nations during the 20th century.

Course Structure

  1. Habsburg Monarchy and its nations 1867-1918: failure of modernity attempt?
  2. Hungary until 1920
  3. Hungary 1920-1945
  4. Hungary 1945-1989
  5. Czech Lands and Czechoslovakia until 1945
  6. Slovakia until 1945
  7. Czechoslovakia 1945 – 1968
  8. Czechoslovakia 1969 – 1992
  9. Poland before 1918 and 1918 – 1944
  10. Poland 1944 – 1989

Politics and Decision Making

Lecturer

  • Lenka Hrbková

Annotation

Politics consists of an extensive number of various decisions made on both individual and collective levels. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the most fundamental topics related with political decision making. The course will review research from political science, psychology, and behavioral economics on judgment and decision making.

Course Structure

  1. Political Judgment, Decisions, and Rationality
  2. Heuristics and Biases
  3. Decisions under Risk and Uncertainty
  4. Emotions and Decision Making
  5. Decisions in Groups
  6. Leadership and Decision Making

Populism in Europe

Lecturer

  • Vlastimil Havlík

Annotation

At the end of the course students should be able to explain basic approaches to studying of populism (as an ideology, a discourse, a communication style), to define main features of populism, and to describe the development and characteristics of the main populist parties in European democracies.  Specific attention is paid to the relationship between populism and democracy and an explanation of the electoral success of populist parties and characteristics of their voters in the context of electoral competition in Europe.

Course Structure

  1. Introduction – approaches to study populism
  2. Populist political parties – definition and classification
  3. Populism and democracy – theoretical introduction I.
  4. Populism and democracy – theoretical introduction II.
  5. Types of populism I.
  6. Types of populism II.
  7. Mid-term test
  8. Populism and democracy in Western Europe
  9. Populism and democracy in Scandinavia
  10. Populism and democracy in Southern Europe
  11. Populism and democracy in Central and Eastern Europe I.
  12. Populism and democracy in Central and Eastern Europe II.
  13. Populism on the quality of democracy – concluding discussion
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